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KHERG Presented in Hamilton on Organ Donation in Islam

In partnership with the Muslim Association of Hamilton (MAH), the Kidney Health Education and Research Group’s Muslim Project had the opportunity to raise awareness of kidney transplant and organ donation within the Hamilton Muslim community on Friday, March 22nd.

Sheikh Sayed M. Tora, Imam of MAH, presented on the permissibility of deceased and living organ donation within Islam and the guidelines regarding each that must be adhered to. Dr. Istvan Mucsi, principal investigator of KHERG and transplant nephrologist at Toronto General Hospital, provided the community with information on kidney disease, organ donation, and transplant from the medical perspective, in harmony with the Islamic perspective. This dynamic approach gave the opportunity for the MAH community to have their concerns answered from the two standpoints.

Members of the MAH community also shared their own personal experiences with their respective kidney diseases and treatments. A community member who had a kidney removed, as well as another individual who had been living with an undiagnosed kidney disease for most of their life, portrayed to their community how they are able to live happy and healthy lives with one kidney. To echo these patient statements, an emotionally riveting letter was read on behalf of a patient from the community who is currently on dialysis and awaiting transplant. Although they could not present their impactful statement in person, the message resonated with all in attendance, demonstrating the need for raising awareness of living donor kidney transplant among the Muslim community.

In all, the event was received with enthusiasm and an eagerness to continue the efforts started from this partnership. Our team greatly appreciates the MAH community for hosting us at this event, and we look forward to future collaborations.

Written by Tibyan Ahmed

Tibyan Ahmed is majoring in medical sciences at Brock University. Her interests lie in reducing psychosocial and ethnocultural barriers to chronic kidney disease and transplantation.

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